A reunited couple celebrates their wedding at a banquet hall in Brooklyn three years after being engaged in Darfur.

A reunited couple celebrates their wedding at a banquet hall in Brooklyn three years after being engaged in Darfur.

 The groom's palms are painted with henna, a tradition for men on the days of their wedding and circumcision.

The groom's palms are painted with henna, a tradition for men on the days of their wedding and circumcision.

 Friends and relatives lift the groom before the ceremony.

Friends and relatives lift the groom before the ceremony.

 Members of the Darfurian community protest against the Sudanese government near the United Nations.

Members of the Darfurian community protest against the Sudanese government near the United Nations.

 Darfurians gather to celebrate the International Criminal Court's decision to issue an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir who was accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Darfurians gather to celebrate the International Criminal Court's decision to issue an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir who was accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

 Groups supporting and opposing the Sudanese government clash at a rally near the United Nations.

Groups supporting and opposing the Sudanese government clash at a rally near the United Nations.

 A demonstrator is arrested following a clash between groups opposing and supporting the Sudanese government.

A demonstrator is arrested following a clash between groups opposing and supporting the Sudanese government.

 Darfurian immigrants break the day's Ramadan fast with assida, a thick porridge made from ground millet and okra.

Darfurian immigrants break the day's Ramadan fast with assida, a thick porridge made from ground millet and okra.

 A woman prepares dessert with her daughter in their Brooklyn apartment.

A woman prepares dessert with her daughter in their Brooklyn apartment.

 Anes Mahamat, 6, watches the Disney Channel in his bedroom.

Anes Mahamat, 6, watches the Disney Channel in his bedroom.

 Gouma Mahamat holds religious sephaa beads in his Kensington apartment. The faint lines on his temple, received at age 2, identify him as a member of the Zaghawa tribe. Mr. Mahamat, a father of five, arrived in the United States in 1987. He considers himself the founder of the Brooklyn enclave of immigrants from Darfur, which now numbers over 300.

Gouma Mahamat holds religious sephaa beads in his Kensington apartment. The faint lines on his temple, received at age 2, identify him as a member of the Zaghawa tribe. Mr. Mahamat, a father of five, arrived in the United States in 1987. He considers himself the founder of the Brooklyn enclave of immigrants from Darfur, which now numbers over 300.

 Mahdi Nouk, who drives a cab 13 hours a day, takes a turn in Borough Park, Brooklyn in 2008. Nouk travels frequently to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he has a wife and child. Fort Wayne and Des Moines, Iowa, are among the other locations in the United States with enclaves of immigrants from Darfur. Many of the Sudanese in Brooklyn came by way of Fort Wayne, where they had trouble finding enough work.

Mahdi Nouk, who drives a cab 13 hours a day, takes a turn in Borough Park, Brooklyn in 2008. Nouk travels frequently to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he has a wife and child. Fort Wayne and Des Moines, Iowa, are among the other locations in the United States with enclaves of immigrants from Darfur. Many of the Sudanese in Brooklyn came by way of Fort Wayne, where they had trouble finding enough work.

 Ahmat Nour, president of the Darfur People's Association of New York (DPANY), delivers bananas to a bodegas and grocery stores off Coney Island Ave. in Brooklyn.

Ahmat Nour, president of the Darfur People's Association of New York (DPANY), delivers bananas to a bodegas and grocery stores off Coney Island Ave. in Brooklyn.

 Abdallah Abaker, 37, who came to the United States from Darfur in 2001, works on a painting of Nelson Mandela. Mr. Abaker paints when he is not driving a taxi, which he does 13 hours a day, seven days a week.

Abdallah Abaker, 37, who came to the United States from Darfur in 2001, works on a painting of Nelson Mandela. Mr. Abaker paints when he is not driving a taxi, which he does 13 hours a day, seven days a week.

 Farrah Kharif, 35, looks out from the second floor of his Marlborough Street apartment three years after immigrating to the United States from Darfur.

Farrah Kharif, 35, looks out from the second floor of his Marlborough Street apartment three years after immigrating to the United States from Darfur.

 A reunited couple celebrates their wedding at a banquet hall in Brooklyn three years after being engaged in Darfur.
 The groom's palms are painted with henna, a tradition for men on the days of their wedding and circumcision.
 Friends and relatives lift the groom before the ceremony.
 Members of the Darfurian community protest against the Sudanese government near the United Nations.
 Darfurians gather to celebrate the International Criminal Court's decision to issue an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir who was accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
 Groups supporting and opposing the Sudanese government clash at a rally near the United Nations.
 A demonstrator is arrested following a clash between groups opposing and supporting the Sudanese government.
 Darfurian immigrants break the day's Ramadan fast with assida, a thick porridge made from ground millet and okra.
 A woman prepares dessert with her daughter in their Brooklyn apartment.
 Anes Mahamat, 6, watches the Disney Channel in his bedroom.
 Gouma Mahamat holds religious sephaa beads in his Kensington apartment. The faint lines on his temple, received at age 2, identify him as a member of the Zaghawa tribe. Mr. Mahamat, a father of five, arrived in the United States in 1987. He considers himself the founder of the Brooklyn enclave of immigrants from Darfur, which now numbers over 300.
 Mahdi Nouk, who drives a cab 13 hours a day, takes a turn in Borough Park, Brooklyn in 2008. Nouk travels frequently to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he has a wife and child. Fort Wayne and Des Moines, Iowa, are among the other locations in the United States with enclaves of immigrants from Darfur. Many of the Sudanese in Brooklyn came by way of Fort Wayne, where they had trouble finding enough work.
 Ahmat Nour, president of the Darfur People's Association of New York (DPANY), delivers bananas to a bodegas and grocery stores off Coney Island Ave. in Brooklyn.
 Abdallah Abaker, 37, who came to the United States from Darfur in 2001, works on a painting of Nelson Mandela. Mr. Abaker paints when he is not driving a taxi, which he does 13 hours a day, seven days a week.
 Farrah Kharif, 35, looks out from the second floor of his Marlborough Street apartment three years after immigrating to the United States from Darfur.

A reunited couple celebrates their wedding at a banquet hall in Brooklyn three years after being engaged in Darfur.

The groom's palms are painted with henna, a tradition for men on the days of their wedding and circumcision.

Friends and relatives lift the groom before the ceremony.

Members of the Darfurian community protest against the Sudanese government near the United Nations.

Darfurians gather to celebrate the International Criminal Court's decision to issue an arrest warrant for Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir who was accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Groups supporting and opposing the Sudanese government clash at a rally near the United Nations.

A demonstrator is arrested following a clash between groups opposing and supporting the Sudanese government.

Darfurian immigrants break the day's Ramadan fast with assida, a thick porridge made from ground millet and okra.

A woman prepares dessert with her daughter in their Brooklyn apartment.

Anes Mahamat, 6, watches the Disney Channel in his bedroom.

Gouma Mahamat holds religious sephaa beads in his Kensington apartment. The faint lines on his temple, received at age 2, identify him as a member of the Zaghawa tribe. Mr. Mahamat, a father of five, arrived in the United States in 1987. He considers himself the founder of the Brooklyn enclave of immigrants from Darfur, which now numbers over 300.

Mahdi Nouk, who drives a cab 13 hours a day, takes a turn in Borough Park, Brooklyn in 2008. Nouk travels frequently to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he has a wife and child. Fort Wayne and Des Moines, Iowa, are among the other locations in the United States with enclaves of immigrants from Darfur. Many of the Sudanese in Brooklyn came by way of Fort Wayne, where they had trouble finding enough work.

Ahmat Nour, president of the Darfur People's Association of New York (DPANY), delivers bananas to a bodegas and grocery stores off Coney Island Ave. in Brooklyn.

Abdallah Abaker, 37, who came to the United States from Darfur in 2001, works on a painting of Nelson Mandela. Mr. Abaker paints when he is not driving a taxi, which he does 13 hours a day, seven days a week.

Farrah Kharif, 35, looks out from the second floor of his Marlborough Street apartment three years after immigrating to the United States from Darfur.

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